Retention

Discover solutions for retaining women in technology and science classes and careers.

Lori Johnson, President of Ladies Start Your Engines, an automotive class for women, gives your students tips for developing professional relationships with men in automotive technology. She also advises women on how to advance their careers through industry networking and setting clear professional goals.

Please click here to listen to the podcast.

This long-term study of more than 50 undergraduate engineering programs examined women's experiences and persistence. Discover the importance of Women in Engineering programs on campus and other tools to increase retention rates of women.

Source:

Goodman, Irene and Christine Cunningham, "Final Report of the Women's Experiences in College Engineering (WECE) Project," Goodman Research Group, April 2002.

This case study describes the results of using an easy-to-follow 3-step systematic framework that empowers students by enhancing their ability to learn principles and concepts.

In 2007, 10 of Phillip Jelinek's 125 Automotive Technology students in Monrovia, CA were female. In his 21 years of teaching this class, he has always had between 3 and 13 girls in his classes. It's clear that he uses recruitment and retention strategies that work.

Geri Hertel, M. Ed., takes you through the step-by-step process of creating a Women in Technology class, including a sample curriculum.

Please click here to access the webinar.

At North Carolina State University, female chemical engineering students start strong but quickly become discouraged. Learn how to keep more women in the engineering pipeline.

Source:

Felder, Richard M., Gary N. Felder, Meredith Mauney, Charles E. Hamrin, and E J. Dietz, "A Longitudinal Study of Engineering Student Performance and Retention," Journal of Engineering Education (84):151-163 (1995). American Society for Engineering Education.

A study of over 500 women in engineering reveals lack of self-confidence leads to program drop-outs, while support networks lead to improved retention. The GPAs of women who dropped out were as high as those retained.

Source:

Copyright © 1997 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Reprinted from, Brainard, Suzanne G. Ph.D, and Linda Carlin, "A Longitudinal Study of Undergraduate Women in Engineering and Science," Proceedings from the ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, 1997. This material is posted here with permission of the IEEE. Such permission of the IEEE does not in any way imply IEEE endorsement of any of the products or services of the Institute for Women in Trades, Technology & Science (IWITTS). Internal or personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution must be obtained from the IEEE by writing to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. By choosing to view this document, you agree to all provisions of the copyright laws protecting it.

Find out 19 specific recommendations to recruit and retain more women to a computer science major, with action steps for implementation.

Source:

McGrath Cohoon, J., "Recruiting and Retaining Women in Undergraduate Computing Majors," SIGCSE Bulletin, Vol. 34, No.2, June 2002.

Donna Milgram, Executive Director of IWITTS, discusses strategies for educators to recruit and retain more women to technology with Gordon F. Snyder, Jr. and Mike Qaissaunee.

Please click here to listen to the podcast.

Why do women abandon computer science? This in-depth study of 14 women at the beginning of a computer science degree explores the factors that shape their decisions.

Source:

Powell, Rita, "Sundials in the Shade: A Study of Women's Persistence in the First Year of a Computer Science Program at a Selective University," Grace Hopper Women in Computing Conference, 2006.

El Camino College expanded lab time for their welding and electronics classes, enabling students to work on assignments while other classes are in session. This has benefited all students, but especially female students in introductory courses, who often need more time to learn lab tools and techniques. El Camino College is one of eight colleges that participated in IWITTS' NSF-funded CalWomenTech Project.

Find out the techniques used by the Women in Computer Engineering (TWiCE) program at Ohio State University to successfully retain its participants.

Source:

Bair, Bettina and J. McGrath Cohoon, "TWiCE Undergraduate Experience in Research and Community Service," Grace Hopper Women in Computing Conference, 2006.

Sheryl A. Sorby, Ph.D., explains how improving your female students' spatial reasoning skills increases their success in the technology classroom. The webinar includes a demonstration of Dr. Sorby's software, "Introduction to 3D Spatial Visualization: An Active Approach."

Please click here to access the webinar.

Five bright female engineering students reveal that they're "tired of fighting" to fit into male-dominated classes that often feel hostile. Learn about recommended support strategies when there are very few women.

Source:

Bennett, Dorothy, "Voices of Young Women in Engineering", Center for Children and Technology Reports (4) May 1996.

Evergreen Valley College (EVC), one of eight CalWomenTech Project Sites, went from a 57.6% to 100% female completion rate in 6 months time with an aggregate rate of 88.3% over two years in the Project. Male retention rate also increased from 60.8% to 86.4% (a 25.6% increase).

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Las Positas College, one of eight CalWomenTech Project Sites, increased their enrollment of female students in the trades through implementation of their recruitment strategic plan over two years and a variety of creative strategies ranging from free press coverage of their program on a local TV station (and showcasing the clip on their website) to a pink "Women in Technology RULE" emery board/ruler give-away.

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In addition to implementing core recruitment strategies provided by the CalWomenTech project, City College of San Francisco's Computer Networking and Information Technology Program, one of eight project sites, incorporated custom recruitment strategies into their annual strategic plans, with a special focus on the college's counseling staff. What's more, adjustments to teaching styles -- based on IWITTS' retention training -- positively impacted completion rates of not only female students, but males as well.

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San Diego Mesa Community College, one of eight CalWomenTech Project Sites, used the CalWomenTech Project's core recruitment strategies along with a special focus on women students during their annual GIS day to significantly increase the number of women in their GIS program. Plus, GIS instructors modified their teaching style based on the WomenTech Training they received on retention, resulting in 100% retention of female and male students for several semesters.

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